The Robot’s Ghost

robotghost

The robot died,
Not from a cough,
But from its head,
Being kicked off,

Don’t worry about,
Our metallic friend,
Because for him,
It wasn’t the end,

Robots don’t vanish,
After they’re dead,
His ghost haunts the lab,
Carrying its head.


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The Giant Bookworm

A bookworm went,
To the library,
To eat all the books,
That he could see,

He ate several pages,
That’s what he planned,
Then he munched on,
Alice in Wonderland,

He ate a picture of the cake,
Labelled “Eat Me”,
And he grew so very large,
Dominating the library,

He ate every single book,
And some people too,
So don’t go the library,
Or else he will eat you.


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Sandy the Salamander

sandy

‘Eat yummy dishes from the sea, and you’ll grow up smart and strong like me…’

They say that every ending is a new beginning, and I suppose that was certainly true for me, though I was doing something I should have done a long time ago. For so many years I had considered doing it, but it was only when Sal’s Seafood closed its doors that I finally built up the nerve.

‘We have the best meals in town, and have a drink to wash it down.’

Almost everything had been taken from the restaurant, but I was one of the few things remaining. Lying on the floor amid the debris was “Sandy Salamander’s Kids’ Menu”, which, after much struggling, I had escaped from.

Free. Free from my two-dimensional prison. Free from the flat sea and the taste of battered cod, fish burgers and mushy peas. Good thing too; I had seen enough children pull the “see, food” joke after looking at the wares I promoted.

‘Eat yummy dishes from the sea, and you’ll grow up smart and strong like me…’

I looked around at what was once a lively place for families and tourists to have dinner, now reduced to crumbling walls under a purple sky. Looking up, I took a deep breath and relished my first breath of natural air. When looking down at the remains of the place I once called home, I wanted to say ‘Good riddance,’ yet the sight chilled me. Even looking at was once the playground gave me a pang of disappointment; the ship wheel had been removed, and I remember wanting to try it out.

After taking another deep breath, I stepped away from what was once a seafood restaurant to explore new horizons. I’m even certain one of the excavators there said goodbye.

‘We have the best meals in town, and have a drink to wash it down.’

The worst part of living on a menu for most of your life is that all you can taste is the food and drink on that menu. I needed to sample drink other than cola and orange squash. My tongue demanded new tastes, and I was already getting that from the air I had been denied. As I passed by the shops still standing, I looked at the foods they were selling and attempted to imagine what eating them would be like. What would rock taste like? Candy floss? Plenty of stores sold ice cream, but I had had enough of that – it was on the “Puddings” section of my menu after all.

There were also a lot of other seafood restaurants I saw – most likely the reason mine closed down – but I made sure to ignore them.

When I arrived at my destination – the sand and the sea – it was then I realised.

Realised what? Well, there was why I didn’t escape sooner – humans would be horrified at the sight of a giant salamander wearing clothes and there would thus be little chance of me making a living. There was the fact I was standing right in the open where anyone could see me. There was the fact that I owe my very existence to a restaurant people stopped going to.

And there was the fact that ever since I escaped, I was still reciting the poetry on my menu.

Again, I took a deep breath, attempting to clear my head. I tasted the salt in the air to forget the repetitive tastes of my menu. I looked at the sea to forget the sight of my ruined home. I listened to the sound of crashing waves and the crunching of sand under my feet to forget the imagined screams of people seeing me.

‘I am standing by the sea,’ I said to myself, ‘because at last, I’m finally free.’

My own poetry. My own rhymes, not the ones the restaurant gave me.

‘I’m at the beach with the cool night air,’ I said, ‘because there’s so much for me there.’

A human approached me. He saw me and approached me, notebook in his hand. I almost ran, but froze when he said ‘Hi!’ I couldn’t help but say that phrase back.

‘Glad to hear the sea inspires you to write poetry as well.’

So, now that kids’ menus are off the table for me, I’m going to become a poet. I suppose I could do worse.


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The Robot Bed

robotbed

It clatters on spider legs,
It has a grinning head,
It’s made mostly of cold metal,
And it’s meant to be a bed,

When this robotic creature,
Makes it way to town,
It’ll grab you with your claws,
And force you to lie down,

It’ll send you straight to sleep,
You won’t snore or even scream,
As its claws dig in your head,
And bring you unpleasant dreams.


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The Undead Castle

undeadcastle

Don’t you dare go near,
That crumbling old castle,
Unless you want to see,
Something supernatural,

The entrance to the castle,
Looks like a head,
And it’s alive,
No, actually undead,

It was once a regal,
Beautiful place,
It’s been dead for centuries,
But now it’s back from the grave,

When it sees a human,
The castle has a grin,
It opens its mouth,
And beckons you in.


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My Favourite TV Show

Hi everybody,
I think you should know,
About my favourite,
TV show,

It’s a show,
You shouldn’t miss,
And it’s called,
The Dark Abyss,

‘What’s it about?’
Well, my friend,
You stare into darkness,
For hours on end,

It’s better than it sounds,
And quite insightful, too,
Watch and you’ll learn,
A lot about you.


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